Last edited by Samurisar
Friday, July 10, 2020 | History

5 edition of The tragedy of black lung found in the catalog.

The tragedy of black lung

federal compensation for occupational disease

by Barth, Peter S.

  • 139 Want to read
  • 17 Currently reading

Published by W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research in Kalamazoo, MI .
Written in English

    Places:
  • United States.
    • Subjects:
    • Lungs -- Dust diseases -- Government policy -- United States.,
    • Lungs -- Dust diseases -- Law and legislation -- United States.,
    • Workers" compensation -- United States.

    • Edition Notes

      Includes bibliographies and index.

      StatementPeter S. Barth.
      ContributionsW.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsHD7264 .B37 1987
      The Physical Object
      Paginationxi, 292 p. ;
      Number of Pages292
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL2379788M
      ISBN 100880990449, 0880990457
      LC Control Number87008332

        Black lung, a chronic disease caused by breathing in coal mine dust, declined precipitously between the early s and late s, following new health and safety rules put in . Get this from a library! Black lung: anatomy of a public health disaster. [Alan Derickson] -- In the definitive history of a twentieth-century public health disaster, Alan Derickson recounts how, for decades after methods of prevention were known, hundreds of thousands of American miners.

        "Each case of advanced black lung disease is an entirely preventable tragedy, and represents mine operators' unwillingness to adequately control mine dust exposures, and safety regulators failure. Black lung, also called Black-lung Disease, or Coal-workers’ Pneumoconiosis, respiratory disorder, a type of pneumoconiosis caused by repeated inhalation of coal dust over a period of years. The disease gets its name from a distinctive blue-black marbling of the lung caused by accumulation of the dust. Georgius Agricola, a German mineralogist, first described lung disease in coal miners in.

      Incidence. The incidence of black lung disease had actually declined to record lows in the s due to the Coal Act. Since that time, the prevalence of black lung disease (combining both simple and complex) has increased significantly according to a study reported in the American Journal of Public Health. At the current time, black lung disease is present in over 10% of miners who have. Search for "Black Lung Program Manual" Books in the Search Form now, Download or Read Books for FREE, just by Creating an Account to enter our library. More than 1 Million Books in Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Tuebl and Audiobook formats. Hourly Update.


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The tragedy of black lung by Barth, Peter S. Download PDF EPUB FB2

Black Lung is a cautionary tale, warning of the consequences of allowing economic and political considerations to control public health decisions.

Engaging, well-organized, and fast-paced, the book guides the reader through a century of change in the mining, scientific, and regulatory by: : Tragedy of Black Lung: Federal Compensation for Occupational Disease (): Barth, Peter S.: Books. "The definitive account of this American tragedy, Black Lung is a very important book for the history of American public policy and also adds substantially to our understanding of the industrial revolution." Kathryn Kish Sklar "Alan Derickson's Black Lung chronicles a century of betrayal of the coal miners—decades of duplicity, cover-up, and cowardliness by the coal barons, government officials, and the miners' own union leaders Price: $ "The definitive account of this American tragedy, Black Lung is a very important book for the history of American public policy and also adds substantially to our understanding of the industrial revolution."-- Kathryn Kish Sklar, Binghamton University/5(2).

Black Lung: Anatomy of a Public Health Disaster: Medicine & Health Science Books @ (2). or Black Lung program was substantially modified in and later, and it is premature to detail more recent experience. Moreover, by the program had largely accomplished the goals its supporters had set for it.

Although the amendments of are referred to when necessary throughout the text, they treated in this study almost asCited by: 4. black lung deskbook; part topics; part i: introduction: part ii: definitions: part iii: procedural issues: part iv: administrative processing of claims, powers and duties of the administrative law judge: part v: benefits review board policies and procedures: part vi: establishing entitlement under 20.

"The definitive account of this American tragedy, Black Lung is a very important book for the history of American public policy and also adds substantially to our understanding of the industrial revolution."--Kathryn Kish Sklar, Binghamton University "An important contribution to the history of the coal industry and its economic and social impact.5/5(1).

NOTICE: This Black Lung Deskbook was created solely to assist the staff of the Benefits Review Board in researching cases arising under the Federal Coal Mine Health and Safety Act ofas amended. This Deskbook in no way constitutes the official opinion of the Board or any of its members on any subject.

The Deskbook does not necessarily contain an exhaustive or a current treatment of Board. The underground mine fires ravaging Pennsylvania coal country have forced eleven-year-old Brigid Howley and her family to seek refuge with her estranged grandparents, the formidable Gram and the black lung stricken Gramp.

Tragedy is no stranger to the Howleys, a proud Irish-American clan who takes strange pleasure in the "curse" laid upon them /5(). The History of Black Lung.

Black lung is not a new disease. Ever since humans first started mining coal nearly 5, years ago in Bronze Age China,9 those who worked in the mines breathed in the black dust that, over time, destroyed their lungs.

Writing inScottish physician Archibald Makellar sketched out the course of the disease in miners exposed to extremely high levels Cited by: 9. Before Black Lung, The Hawks Nest Tunnel Disaster Killed Hundreds Before Black Lung, The Hawks Nest Tunnel Disaster Killed Hundreds In the photo above, dust circles a worker during the construction.

In the definitive history of a twentieth-century public health disaster, Alan Derickson recounts how, for decades, the combined failure of government, medicine, and industry to halt the spread of black lung disease—and even to acknowledge its existence—resulted in a national tragedy.

​The Tragedy of Black Lung ​. The UpJohn Institute, This research book was written shortly after miners began to receive black lung benefits. Barth (born in ) made several important observations about the nature of coal mining.

Black Lung: Anatomy of a Public Health Disaster eBook: Derickson, Alan: : Kindle Store5/5(1). "The Tragedy of Black Lung: Federal Compensation for Occupational Disea" by Peter S. Barth This study details the development of the federal government's Black Lung program and evaluates its policy components.

This study details the development of the federal government's Black Lung program and evaluates its policy by: 4. Book Description: In the definitive history of a twentieth-century public health disaster, Alan Derickson recounts how, for decades after methods of prevention were known, hundreds of thousands of American miners suffered and died from black lung, a respiratory illness caused by.

In the definitive history of a twentieth-century public health disaster, Alan Derickson recounts how, for decades after methods of prevention were known, hundreds of thousands of American miners suffered and died from black lung, a respiratory illness caused by the inhalation of coal mine by: Get this from a library.

The tragedy of black lung: federal compensation for occupational disease. [Peter S Barth; W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research.]. In the definitive history of a twentieth-century public health disaster, Alan Derickson recounts how, for decades, the combined failure of government, medicine, and industry to halt the spread of black lung disease--and even to acknowledge its existence--resulted in a national tragedy.

"The Development of the Black Lung Act." In The Tragedy of Black Lung: Federal Compensation for Occupational Disease. Kalamazoo, MI: W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research, pp.

Cited by: 4.The Development of the Black Lung Act. Until early in the twentieth century, an employer's liability for compensating an employee who was disabled as a result of a workplace injury was determined in a civil action.1 Similarly, the survivor of an employee killed on the job was entitled to compensation from the employer only as a result.Black lung Surges; A Tragedy – But Not a Surprise From the early days of the 20th Century, until the passage of the Coal Act in the wake of the Farmington #9 Disaster, overminers died in the United States from Black Lung Disease.